The Psalms-November 22

 

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 146

 

Things to Consider:  How long will the psalmist praise the Lord, and what reasons does he give that makes God praiseworthy? How does our approach to praising God change based on the circumstances of our life? When does this attitude of praise seem to come most naturally to you, and why do you think this might be?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 147:1-11

 

Things to Consider:  In this psalm of praise, the psalmist seems to begin in these verses by focusing on the intimacy God has with His creation. How has He shown His great love and tender care to you? What does a genuine response of praise look like to you?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 147:12-20

 

Things to Consider:  The psalmist reflects on the favor God has shown to Jerusalem, due to those dwelling in Jerusalem being His children. How has God shown His favor to you, as His child? What are some things that remind you that He loves you? What response do you think God is looking for?

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 148

 

Things to Consider:  In this psalm of praise, the psalmist looks at God’s glory, and all that makes Him worthy of our praise, from the perspective of the heavens, earth, and seas. How do these different realms declare God’s glory for us? How has God revealed His glory most powerfully in your own life?

 

Friday: Read Psalm 149

 

Things to Consider:  What does it mean to sing to the Lord a new song? What specific privileges, belonging to God’s people, does the psalmist point out in this psalm? What does it mean for God to take pleasure in His people, and how does this impact your own relationship with Him?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 150

 

Things to Consider:  What emotions and/or feelings does this psalm, which concludes the entire psalter, elicit as you read through it? What makes God worthy of this kind of joyful praise, and how is our worship of Him related to the specific circumstances of our life?

 



the Psalms-November 15

 

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 146

 

Things to Consider:  How long will the psalmist praise the Lord, and what reasons does he give that makes God praiseworthy? How does our approach to praising God change based on the circumstances of our life? When does this attitude of praise seem to come most naturally to you, and why do you think this might be?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 147:1-11

 

Things to Consider:  In this psalm of praise, the psalmist seems to begin in these verses by focusing on the intimacy God has with His creation. How has He shown His great love and tender care to you? What does a genuine response of praise look like to you?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 147:12-20

 

Things to Consider:  The psalmist reflects on the favor God has shown to Jerusalem, due to those dwelling in Jerusalem being His children. How has God shown His favor to you, as His child? What are some things that remind you that He loves you? What response do you think God is looking for?

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 148

 

Things to Consider:  In this psalm of praise, the psalmist looks at God’s glory, and all that makes Him worthy of our praise, from the perspective of the heavens, earth, and seas. How do these different realms declare God’s glory for us? How has God revealed His glory most powerfully in your own life?

 

Friday: Read Psalm 149

 

Things to Consider:  What does it mean to sing to the Lord a new song? What specific privileges, belonging to God’s people, does the psalmist point out in this psalm? What does it mean for God to take pleasure in His people, and how does this impact your own relationship with Him?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 150

 

Things to Consider:  What emotions and/or feelings does this psalm, which concludes the entire psalter, elicit as you read through it? What makes God worthy of this kind of joyful praise, and how is our worship of Him related to the specific circumstances of our life?

 



The Psalms-October 18

 

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 136

 

Things to Consider:  This psalm calls God’s people to give thanks to the Lord as part of their worship service. What are some of the reasons they have to be thankful? What role does thankfulness play in your own worship experience? Take some time right now to consider the things God has done in your life, and express your thankfulness to Him.

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 137

 

Things to Consider:  In this psalm, the psalmist reflects on the time that Judah spent in exile in Babylon. In light of this difficult time in their past, what is the psalmist’s request to God? How can you relate the sentiment of this psalm to your own life?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 138

 

Things to Consider:  This psalm kicks off the final section of psalms, running through Psalm 145, that are attributed to King David. Why (specifically) does David give thanks to God in this passage? How have you seen God’s constant care in your own life? Take some time to thank him for all of that today.

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 139:1-18

 

Things to Consider:  How well does God know David, and do you believe that He knows you just as well? What are the implications of God’s intimate knowledge of you? Is this thought scary, comforting, both, or neither? Take some time to consider that question.

 

Friday: Read Psalm 139:19-24

 

Things to Consider:  How do you see these verses fitting in with the first 18 verses of this psalm? How does David want God to treat his enemies, and do you think it is okay for him to have these thoughts and pray this prayer? Why or why not? What does it look like to let God search you and know your heart, and how can you do that today?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 140

 

Things to Consider:  Where does David turn when he is in need of protection? What other options do you think he had available? Where do you tend to turn in times of need, and what are some options (other than the Lord) that you have available to you? Do you believe that God is enough to sustain you, no matter what trials you face? Why or why not?

 



The Psalms-October 11

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 131

 

Things to Consider:  This psalm continues a section of psalms called ‘Songs of Ascent.’ These psalms were intended to be sung by Jewish saints who were traveling up the hill to Jerusalem to worship God at one of the annual feasts. What are the psalmists’ reflections in this psalm? What does it mean to hope in the Lord, and is this something that you are able to do regularly?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 132

 

Things to Consider:  In this ‘Song of Ascent’, the psalmist reflects on David’s relationship with the Lord through various hardships in his life. What lessons does he draw out from David’s relationship with God, and how can we emulate his response to God in our own lives?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 133

 

Things to Consider:  What do you think makes the unity of God’s children so pleasing to Him? What exactly is this unity that He desires, and how can we display it with others today? Have you ever experienced the blessing of living in true Christian unity with others? Take some time to consider how and why this blesses our heavenly Father.

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 134

 

Things to Consider:  In this final ‘Song of Ascent’, the psalmist prepares his audience for their primary mission at the feast awaiting them in Jerusalem. What does it mean to bless the Lord, and how exactly did this take place? How can we bless the Lord today? Is this something that we do sporadically, occasionally, regularly, or constantly? Explain.

 

Friday: Read Psalm 135:1-12

 

Things to Consider:  In this psalm of praise, the psalmist calls God’s people to praise God for all He has done. In this passage, what specifically does he point to that God has done in order to be worthy of our praise? How has God shown His greatness in your own life, and how can you praise Him for that today?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 135:13-21

 

Things to Consider:  How long will God’s Name endure, and what exactly does this mean? How does God’s infinite nature contrast with the existence of idols? What were some of the idols that Hebrews were drawn to? What are some of the idols that you are drawn to, and how do they rob God of the praise that He is due? Take some time today to bless the Lord for who He is.

 



The Psalms-September 13

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 125

 

Things to Consider:  Throughout this week, we will continue to work our way through the section of psalms called the ‘Songs of Ascent’ – psalms that were sung by Jewish pilgrims making their way to Jerusalem for the annual feasts. What influence did that particular journey have on this psalm? What do we learn about God in these verses?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 126

 

Things to Consider:  Although we don’t know the specific crisis the psalmist faced when he wrote this psalm, we can still make sense of his request before God. How have you experienced God’s mercy and blessing in the past, and in what areas of your life would you like to see that again today?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 127

 

Things to Consider:  The psalmist makes the important point that even our greatest efforts are worthless without God’s blessing. How have you experienced failure when you have depended solely on your own efforts, and how has that failure shaped your relationship with God? How have you experienced success when you have depended on God’s leading and provision, and how has this shaped your relationship with God?

 

Thursday: Read Psalm 128

 

Things to Consider:  Who exactly does this psalmist say is blessed? What does it mean to fear the Lord, and what does the blessing that this fear brings look like for us today? How might our picture (or understanding) of blessedness differ from that of those who lived in the Ancient Near East?

 

Friday: Read Psalm 129

 

Things to Consider:  The psalmist takes this opportunity to reflect on God’s faithful presence throughout his life, even in the midst of his darkest trials. How have you experienced God’s faithful presence throughout your life—before you knew Him, during difficult seasons, and in times of blessing and plenty? Take some time to reflect on God’s blessing in your life.

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 130

 

Things to Consider:  What hope do sinners have in the presence of the Lord? Why would it have been important for Jewish pilgrims to reflect on the truths in this psalm on their way to the feasts in Jerusalem? How often do you reflect on the freedom and beauty of being forgiven, and why is it important for us to do this regularly?

 



The Psalms-September 6

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 119:169-176

 

Things to Consider:  This is the final passage in Psalm 119, which is the longest chapter in the Bible. Throughout this psalm,  the psalmist has been celebrating the gift of God’s Word.  What is the connection between God’s Law and His salvation?  What reasons does the psalmist have to praise God in this passage? How can you praise God in response to His Word?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 120

 

Things to Consider:  This psalm begins a section of psalms called ‘Songs of Ascent.’ These psalms were intended to be sung by Jewish saints who were traveling up the hill to Jerusalem to worship God at one of the annual feasts. What are the psalmists’ reflections in this psalm?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 121

 

Things to Consider:  It is easy to imagine pilgrims singing this psalm on their journey to Jerusalem. How does the psalmist connect this annual pilgrimage to the journey of life? How have you experienced God’s faithfulness and protection over the past year? How do you see God as your Helper?

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 122

 

Things to Consider:  What specifically was the psalmist celebrating in this psalm? As Christians, what is the meaning of this psalm to us? What do we celebrate and who is our Davidic king?  Where do you go to seek God, and delight in His presence?

 

Friday: Read Psalm 123

 

Things to Consider:  Pilgrims would sing this song on their journey up to Jerusalem in order to prepare their hearts for worship during the feasts. How might this psalm have helped to prepare their hearts? How can you use this psalm to prepared your own heart for worship?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 124

 

Things to Consider:  The psalmist rejoices that God has helped Israel so faithfully throughout history. How has God been your help throughout your own life? What does God’s help look like, how do you know when you’ve received it, and how do you respond when it doesn’t look how you expected it to?

 



The Psalms-August 30

 

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 119:121-128

 

Things to Consider: This week, we will continue to work our way through this psalm, which happens to be the longest chapter in the Bible. The psalmist has been celebrating the gift that is God’s Word. What do God’s commandments and His love have to do with one another? How does the psalmist express his response to God’s Word in this passage?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 119:129-136

 

Things to Consider: How has God’s Word brought you wisdom, knowledge, and understanding? Do you believe that it is important for people to uphold God’s Law? Why or why not? How can we convince people of the importance of doing things the way God has designed?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 119:137-144

 

Things to Consider: What does it look like to be zealous for God’s Law? What is the difference between having a healthy zeal for the Law and being legalistic? How can you guard against legalism, and what makes this important for us to do? What do you love about God’s promises?

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 119:145-152

 

Things to Consider: What does it look like to meditate on God’s Word, and is this something you can do regularly? Do you find hope, joy, and satisfaction in God’s Word to the same level as this psalmist? Why or why not? How do you know that God is near to you right now (v.151)?

 

Friday: Read Psalm 119:153-160

 

Things to Consider: How have you found God’s reward in keeping His Law? What are some of the greatest challenges you face that keep you from remaining faithful to His commands? How can you overcome these challenges? Do you believe that the sum of God’s word is truth? Why or why not?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 119:161-168

 

Things to Consider: What is the relationship between our love for God and our obedience to Him? What does your current level of obedience to God say about where you are at in your relationship with Him? What needs to come first in dry seasons, loving God or obeying Him? Why?

 



The Psalms-August 23

 

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 119:73-80

 

Things to Consider: This week, we will continue to work our way through this psalm, which happens to be the longest chapter in the Bible. The psalmist has been celebrating the gift that is God’s Word. What specifically does he know about God’s Word, according to this passage? How does he plan to handle God’s Word in his interactions with others?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 119:81-88

 

Things to Consider: What does it mean to hope in God’s Word? How can we do this, and would you say that you find hope in Scripture? Why or why not? When do we need this kind of hope, and in what ways can you relate to some of the struggles shared by the psalmist here?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 119:89-96

 

Things to Consider: How was the psalmist given life through God’s precepts? What does it mean for God’s Word to be firmly fixed in the heavens? How have you experienced (personally, or through watching others) the faithfulness of God through His Word? How has Scripture brought you comfort and stability in the midst of the uncertainty of this world?

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 119:97-104

 

Things to Consider: What does it mean to meditate on God’s Law? Is this something that you do regularly? How have you experienced the wisdom of God’s commandments, especially compared to the wisdom of the world? Do you believe that God’s Word is truly sweeter than honey to your lips? What is it about the Bible that makes it so impactful to us?

 

Friday: Read Psalm 119:105-112

 

Things to Consider: How has God used His Word to help guide the psalmists’ feet through the trials and snares of life? How has God used His Word to help guide you through the turmoil and tribulations of your own life? How can God use His Word to give you life in the midst of your struggles, fears, insecurities, and shortcomings?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 119:113-120

 

Things to Consider: What does it mean to fear the Lord, and how does this type of fear relate to the profound love and desire the psalmist has for the Word of God? What role does the Bible play in God’s promise to protect (or shield) us from our enemies? How have you experienced this protection in your life?

 



The Psalms-August 16

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 119:25-32

 

Things to Consider: This week, we will continue to work our way through this longest chapter in the Bible, as the psalmist celebrates the gift that is God’s Word. What specific ways does the psalmist ask for God to use His Word in his life in this passage? How does your own experience with the Bible measure up to what the psalmist expresses here?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 119:33-40

 

Things to Consider: What specific ways does the psalmist ask for God to use His Word in his life in this passage? How does your own experience with the Bible measure up to what the psalmist expresses here? What are some of the “worthless things” that your eyes are often drawn to?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 119:41-48

 

Things to Consider: What is the source (or substance) of the psalmist’s trust in the Lord? How has God’s Word brought you comfort throughout your life? What promises has He given us that you are able to cling to during difficult seasons in your life? Are there any promises from Scripture that God has been comforting you with right now (this week)?

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 119:49-56

 

Things to Consider: Why do you think the psalmist finds comfort in God’s rules, and do you also find this kind of comfort? What is the blessing that the psalmist speaks of, that comes from keeping God’s precepts? How can we persevere in keeping/upholding God’s commands, even in the midst of persecution (v.51)?

 

Friday: Read Psalm 119:57-64

 

Things to Consider: What does it mean for the Lord to be your portion, and is this a claim that you can make? What does it look like to hasten to keep God’s commands, and can you think of a time when you have delayed? Who are the psalmists’ companions, and what relevance does this have in your life today? Who are your companions?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 119:65-72

 

Things to Consider: What is the benefit and blessing of God’s Law, and how can we know them? Do you agree with the degree to which the psalmist delights in God’s Law? Why or why not? What role did the Law play in the psalmist’s testimony? What role do God’s commands play in your own testimony?

 



The Psalms-August 9

 

The Book of Psalms is a collection of poetry that captures a wide range of emotions and responses to God, including: love & adoration of the King, worship & praise of Almighty God, sorrow & regret over sin, fear & doubt over trials and or/enemies, and an utter dependence on God. Over the course of this devotional study, we will continue to explore the riches of the psalms. As you will quickly discover, reading the Psalms provides a much different experience than reading almost any other genre of Scripture. These poems weren’t written with the intent of providing direct teaching or clear storytelling; rather, they were composed in order to convey the emotional responses of God’s children to a wide variety of situations—times of joy, fear, doubt, struggle, victory, defeat, or awe (to name a few). For this reason, believers are generally drawn to different psalms at different times in their lives. This preference is often based on one’s own experiences. No matter what you are going through in your life right now, chances are there are several psalms that relate to your current spiritual walk. And even if a particular psalm doesn’t seem applicable to you today, there is a good chance that it will be at some point in the future. So take this opportunity to read, study, pray through, and remember the ancient words contained in these psalms, and allow God to minister to your heart.

 

Monday: Read Psalm 117

 

Things to Consider: In this short psalm, the psalmist simply invites everyone (all nations) to praise the Lord. What reasons does he give his readers to praise the Lord? How have you seen God’s steadfast love and enduring faithfulness in your own life? What does it look like to praise the Lord in response to these truths? How can you do that today?

 

Tuesday: Read Psalm 118:1-16

 

Things to Consider: This psalm closes out the “Egyptian Hallel”, which we began last week with Psalm 113. Again, the psalmist implores everyone to praise the Lord. What reasons does he give us to praise Him in these verses? What does it mean that God is a refuge? How have you experienced this?

 

Wednesday:  Read Psalm 118:17-29

 

Things to Consider: What does God’s discipline look like, both in this psalm and in your own life? Does His discipline inspire fear or comfort for you? Why? What is the psalmist’s attitude as he prepares to enter the house of the Lord (temple)? What lessons can we take from this psalm in our own approach to worshipping the Lord daily?

 

Thursday:     Read Psalm 119:1-8

 

Things to Consider: In this longest chapter of the Bible, the psalmist celebrates the gift that is God’s Word. This psalm forms a Hebrew acrostic, where each section begins with the next letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and we will take one section at a time. Who does the psalmist consider to be blessed in this opening section, and what are the reasons for their blessedness? Would you consider yourself to be part of this blessed group? Why or why not?

 

Friday: Read Psalm 119:9-16

 

Things to Consider: In the psalmist’s view, what is the key to the pursuit of purity? How can seeking God and His Word aid in the battle for purity in the midst of this fallen world? How well do you know God’s Word, and is it something that you meditate on regularly?

 

Saturday: Read Psalm 119:17-24

 

Things to Consider: Why does the psalmist long for God’s Word? What does it mean to be a sojourner on the earth, and how does this contribute to his longing for the Word? Do you share this longing for God’s Word? How have you found delight and counsel in the Word?